PSHE, SMSC & British Values

Science and Technology Faculty SMSC, PSHE and British values

Subjects within the faculty deliver various topics that help to promote students’ Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural development as well as health and wellbeing.
Where ever possible students are also asked to consider British values and how they relate to science and technology.

SMSC
Spiritual Development

Science
• Students are encouraged to debate issues where religious groups may have differing views such as the use of stem cells.

Food technology
• All students will be given the opportunity to reflect on their own experiences by evaluating practical tasks they have carried out.
• All students are encouraged to use their imagination and creativity in designing and adapting food dishes.

Resistant materials
• Through the projects we offer and the curriculum we deliver at both key stages, the students are taught how to investigate products, aesthetic and functional, past and present and examine how they affect the quality of our daily lives. They are encouraged to develop their thinking skills and explore the wider world around them, to reflect upon what they see and develop an open mind and use this inspiration and creativity when approaching their design work.

Moral Development

Science
• Students discuss the rights and wrongs about the study of cells for medical research e.g. using animals
• Students discuss animal and human testing to better understand the body systems where they are asked to weigh up both arguments
• Students learn the importance of fitness and health where they consider the effects of different drugs on the body and relate drugs effects to the law (drug categories, punishment etc)
• Students discuss clinical trials using human cells, animals and human volunteers looking at numerous arguments. Students also have to consider the use of placebos in trials and the implications of giving patients false information.
• Students discuss the study of brain injuries and whether someone who is not of sound mind can consent to treatment and trials.

Food technology
• In year 9 students begin to identify and explore moral food decisions/practices by researching Fairtrade products, people’s diets and sustainability. This then continues in more depth for key stage 4.
Resistant materials
• Students are faced with moral decisions through designing, selecting materials/ingredients, methods of manufacture, considering the needs of others, as well as the sustainability and environmental impact. The 6 R’s are routinely discussed throughout the design & make process. Within the classroom and the wider community students are expected to show respect to others and take responsibility for their own actions and of those around them, taking consequences into consideration.

Social Development

Science
• Students in all years are given various opportunities to work in small and large groups where they are encouraged to lead, communicate and co-operate.

Food technology
• Key stage 4 students learn about different types of communication methods and social skills used in the catering industry, how this can effect a catering establishment and how to overcome certain social situations.

Resistant materials
Students are taught that all their design work should be sensitive to needs and beliefs of different backgrounds, ensuring imagery, text or products won’t cause offence. They think about how their ideas and products have an impact on the world around them. Pupils are encouraged to use the work of designers from a range of cultures and historical contexts to influence and support the development of their work.

Cultural Development

Science
• Students learn some aspects of history and culture in science such as the development of different scientific ideas, inventions and practices.

Food technology
• Year 9 and key stage 4 students learn about other countries food traditions and culture. They discuss how cultural influences have changed or can change our food choices.

PSHE

Science
Personal Development
• All year groups are constantly given opportunities to develop skills and knowledge to help them in the wider world from practical investigative skills, collaborative approaches to tasks and consideration of ethical issues from different viewpoints.

Health Development
• Students complete a unit on microbes and disease and learn various aspects of staying healthy such as hygiene. Also the use of vaccines, antibiotics and the issue of antibiotic resistance are discussed.
• Students complete a unit fitness and health where they look at the benefits of exercise, balanced diet and avoiding drugs (including smoking and alcohol). Much is covered on the risks of drug and alcohol abuse.
• GCSE science discusses the use of medicines and resistance in great detail as well as the risks of obesity.

Food technology

Personal development
• Key stage 3 students develop a wide range of practical cookery skills and knowledge that will equip them with the skills to be confident and independent cooks in the wider world. This continues to be further developed during key stage 4.

Health development
• Throughout key stage 3 and 4 students explore how diet and certain food habits can affect our health both positively and negatively.
• In both key stages students learn about the importance of personal and food hygiene, exploring the effects on health if poor or bad personal/food hygiene practices occur. Pupils learn how to avoid ill health by ensuring high risk foods are cooked/stored properly.

Economic development
• Students begin to identify how the cost of food is an important factor influencing food choice.
• In key stage 4 as part of their controlled assessment students have to work out the costs of food dishes they prepare and begin to look at profit margins.
Resistant materials

Personal Development
• All year groups are constantly given opportunities to develop skills and knowledge and to reflect critically upon their work. Pupils are also encouraged to take pleasure in the process of problem solving and design and in making high quality, functional products in which they can take pride.

Health Development
• Pupils are expected, from their first exposure to the workshop environment, to be safe workers aware of risks to health (both their own and that of others) and hazards which could impact on their safety.

British Values

Science
Confidence/Self Esteem Development
• Students in all year groups are asked to give their own opinion on issues particularly those that have no straight forward right and wrong answer. They are encouraged to not be swayed by others and to stick to opinions where they feel it is right.

Knowledge of Law/Public Institutions
• Key stage 3 students cover issues of drugs and the law including drug categories and their associated punishments.
• GCSE students are given the opportunity to discuss debates about GM crops and how best to voice an opinion in a lawful way.
Democracy
• GCSE students discuss how countries decide on the use of GM crops on a national scale e.g. who decides and who is the decision reached.

Food technology
Knowledge, confidence and self-esteem
• Students in all key stages build on their confidence and knowledge to prepare and cook a variety of foods.
Civil and criminal law
• Students in key stage 4 identify the importance of food laws such as the Food Safety Act and how this can ensure the safety of food establishments and their clientele.

Resistant materials
Confidence/Self Esteem Development
• Students in all year groups are asked to give their own opinion on issues and are encouraged to recognise that design, unlike many other subjects, is not typified by right and wrong answers but rather by a response to influences and needs.

Knowledge of Law/Public Institutions
• Students are made aware of health and safety legislation and of consumer rules which influence design. Use of standards such as the CE mark or BSI are discussed.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Newsletter Subscription
Sending